This will take you to the main site where there is history, technical information and other information on these cars.
This takes you back to the main page of the forums.
This is the control panel to change your password, information and preferences on this message board.
Click here if your lost your password or need to register on this message board. You must be a registered user to post. Registration is free.
Search this board for information you need.
Click here to buy cool Squarebirds mechandise.
Click here to support Squarebirds.org. For $20 annually receive 20mBytes webspace, a Squarebirds e-mail address and member's icon on the message board.
  #1  
Old 10-04-2016, 03:57 PM
pat64tbird's Avatar
pat64tbird pat64tbird is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Apr 3 2014
Posts: 100
pat64tbird is on a distinguished road
Question Help with front suspension.

Hello Members,

I am rebuilding the upper and lower arm on my brothers Thunderbird. According to the factory shop manual (for a 1964 Thunderbird), the Upper Arm Inner Shaft to arm bushing torque is: 100 pounds. But when I torque the two bushings the inner shaft is very hard to move. Is this movement problem normal? If I loosen the bushing by 1/4 turn the inner shaft moves easier.
Another question is: I can get a 45 and a 90 degree grease fitting on the front bushing but not on the rear one. The shock tower is in the way. Has anyone drilled a hole in the shock tower, so that it can be greased from the engine compartment?
Or should I just plug that bushing grease hole? Thank you.

Patrick
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-04-2016, 06:40 PM
pat64tbird's Avatar
pat64tbird pat64tbird is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Apr 3 2014
Posts: 100
pat64tbird is on a distinguished road
Default

Hello Members,

I checked on YouTube and there was a video that answered my questions. If anyone has some information (when they did this project) I would still be interested. Thank you.

Patrick
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-05-2016, 12:51 AM
simplyconnected's Avatar
simplyconnected simplyconnected is offline
Slow Typist
 
Join Date: May 26 2009
Posts: 7,068
simplyconnected is on a distinguished road
Default

Yes Patrick, the end caps require even more than 100 ft/lbs. I drive them all the way home (as the shaft butts against the nut, then back the nut off at least 1/4-turn.

It's impossible for the grease hole to go all the way through the shaft but Ford could have done a better job. The upper shaft normally comes with a zirk or a plug. I would drill another hole from the top of the nut but at the end of the threads, to give clear access to a new zirk IF you're concerned about grease escaping. Orient the new zirk as you install the shaft to the frame.

I buy a good Moly-lithium grease for automotive then I run it through a 'personal test'. I put a dab between my index finger and thumb. When I pull them apart I want to see a LONG string of grease instead of immediate separation. This tells me the grease wicks and sticks to itself so it won't end up in a dried up useless ball hiding in a cranny. Then, I use that same grease for spindle bearings, ball joints and tie rod ends. The last tube I got was for industrial use but I didn't recognize the brand (it was made in Texas, if I recall). - Dave
__________________
My latest project:
CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

"We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
--Lee Iacocca
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-08-2016, 03:07 PM
pat64tbird's Avatar
pat64tbird pat64tbird is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Apr 3 2014
Posts: 100
pat64tbird is on a distinguished road
Default

Thanks Dave.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:47 PM.

Driving, racing or working on cars can be hazardous. The procedures and advice on this website including the message board are opinion only. Squarebirds.org and its webmasters and contributors do not guarantee the correctness of the advice and procedures. The Squarebirds.org and its webmasters assume no liability for any damage, fines, punishment, injury or death resulting from following these procedures or advice. If you do not have the skills or tools to repair your car, please consult a professional. By using this site you agree to hold harmless the Squarebirds.org, its authors and its webmasters from any resulting claim and costs that may occur from using the information found on this site.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Any submissions to this site and any post on this site becomes property of Squarebirds.org . The webmasters reserve the right to edit and modify any submissions to this site. All material on this is site is copyrighted by the Squarebirds.org. Reproduction by any means other than for personal use is strictly prohibited. Permission to use material on this site can be obtained by contacting the webmasters. Copyright 2002-2016 by Squarebirds.org.