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  #1  
Old 03-06-2013, 12:09 AM
63Tealbird 63Tealbird is offline
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Smile torque monster

Since I have to tear into. My 390 to finnish a restoration that started and stopped 15 years ago hp is not nearly as important with a curb weight of over4100lbs torque is what gets us moving 428 crank not out of question although balanceing it could get$$$ though what part of hobby isn't degree cam but any ideas are welcome. Thanx. Jeff
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  #2  
Old 03-21-2013, 02:52 PM
davidmij davidmij is offline
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Hey Jeff, I was just looking at this the other day. From what I understand the longer the stroke the more torque. A short stroke will allow for more RPM's and thus higher HP at higher RPM's.
This link here gives a few examples of what to expect from different length strokes.
http://www.coasthigh.com/Ford-FE-engine-kits-s/1302.htm

I'm not a mechanic - I'm sure the others guys on here can give you some good ideas on cam timing etc.

Dave J
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  #3  
Old 03-21-2013, 03:24 PM
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Think of the crankshaft pin (the part that holds the connecting rod) as a lever. Now turn the crank so the pin is at 90 degrees. Given the same explosion at the piston top, a longer lever (stroke) will increase torque dramatically.

We can't just make the lever longer without consequences. Longer strokes require longer connecting rods, to keep the piston straighter. So longer con rod lengths help boost torque. Together, they are dynamite.

Enter the Harley~Davidson. They used Chevy 4" pistons with real long strokes. Using only two pistons, they delivered 70 hp and got 50 mpg. This is not a high rpm motor. Cruising down the road at 40mph feels like some giant is pushing from behind and you can feel each pump of his legs. It's an awesome feeling that never goes away. - Dave
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  #4  
Old 03-21-2013, 09:04 PM
63Tealbird 63Tealbird is offline
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Thumbs up torque monster

Dave and Dave thanks was not sure about longer rods thought coast high performance only did small block thought wrong have to contact as 390 internal balenced 428 external. That and found machine shop within 25 miles that used to race FE'S so that's my man was never sure about hyperurtectic until your posted rebuild of penolpe how did it finally turn out. Thanks again. Jeff
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Old 03-22-2013, 01:10 AM
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Jeff, how's your New York weather? Here in Detroit it's cold and very windy. I put Penelope away until the weather breaks because I don't have a heated shop, then I will jump back into it.

Regarding the component materials I use, I always look at modern cars and modern engines. If we don't get 200,000 miles out of a modern engine there's something wrong.

When Squarebirds were built, if we got 80,000 out of an engine, that was about right. What's the difference? Both engines are basically the same, aren't they? Well, no. The materials are vastly improved and they reformulated our oil and gasoline.

Most engines today have aluminum heads, hypereutectic alloy pistons, moly rings, roller cams, are made to burn gasohol, and run on oil that has very little zinc and phosphorous. Modern engines run a lot hotter with higher pressure cooling systems. Electric fans and EFI helps, too. Totally different from standards Squarebird engines were built to. Put it all together and you get an efficient engine that runs 250,000 miles before the next overhaul. - Dave
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  #6  
Old 03-22-2013, 08:41 AM
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If I may add-

If an older engine series is machined and assembled correctly, has a functioning crankcase ventilation system and proper fuel calibration along with a hot ignition and is placed on a proper PM schedule, it will last indefinitely.
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Old 03-22-2013, 12:33 PM
davidmij davidmij is offline
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Great explanation and analogy in post #3 Dave Dare. That makes it easy to understand where the torque (power) comes from.
Thanks!
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  #8  
Old 03-22-2013, 09:22 PM
63Tealbird 63Tealbird is offline
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Dave thanks for info still cold and windy here on long island. Just started new job 70 miles each way leave house 430 am home 630-77pm
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:10 AM
gaffney1951 gaffney1951 is offline
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Default Torque ...

A 4.25" stroker kit and a .030 over bore will get you 445",s. That setup with crank, rods, forged pistons/pins & chrome molly rings, with main and rod bearings, balanced will run you around $1700. Not very hard to get 500+ft/lbs with a very broad torque curve. That will put a smile on your face. Have your block sonic checked for wall thickness before you put any money into it. If you go 428 crank with a .030 overbore that will net you around 416",s. By the time you pay to have the crank turned and polished, the rods reconditioned (personally I wouldn't use 50 year old rods in a nice engine), and new pistons/rings and all the other items listed with the above package you are pretty close, or at the price of the 445 setup. It's good to have a Bad Bird. Mike
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Old 03-23-2013, 06:13 AM
63Tealbird 63Tealbird is offline
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Smile torqe monster

Mike I agree Dave Jones post coast high performance has 428 crank based stroker kit all crank rods piston rings bearins for about 1800. Not bad for bottom end wouldn't think of not having at least magnafluxed kit is for. 30 over balancing extra good deal basically parts Dave Dare recommended thanks again Jeff
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