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  #1  
Old 09-07-2012, 12:29 PM
davidmij davidmij is offline
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Default 1967 390 timing chain

Hi all, I've never pulled the front off an engine before. I'm replacing my timing chain and gears. I removed the 3 bolts and the large center bolt (the one you use to crank the engine when rotating the engine to TDC) Now I believe I need to use a wheel puller to get the cent shaft off. Is that correct?
I'm just want to make sure before I force anything.

Also, does anyone know where I might find some basic instructions on line. I'm using my 1959 T-bird shop manula, but I think the old 352 was a little different.

thx, Dave J
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  #2  
Old 09-07-2012, 12:36 PM
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There isn't much difference and your '59 shop manual should get you there. Take lots of pictures as you go, David.
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Old 09-07-2012, 12:57 PM
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The '60 352 has a damper pulley behind the power steering pulley. Be sure and use a wheel puller with the slotted bolt holes and not the jaw type of puller if your pulley/damper has the rubber ring in it. You run the risk of pulling the pulley grove off the main portion of the pulley with the jaw type puller.

This is not a Ford but at about 7 mins it shows the type puller you need.
http://video.search.yahoo.com/video/...t&fr=yfp-t-701

or even better - just watch Dave do it....
http://www.squarebirds.org/penelope/390Build/TimingSetRemoval.htm

Eric
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Old 09-07-2012, 01:06 PM
gaffney1951 gaffney1951 is offline
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Default Timing cover ...

Best to use an installation tool when putting the damper back on as it's not that hard to strip out the crank threads just using the stock bolt. Also be aware that one of the timing cover bolts(passenger side) goes through to water and you need to use a sealant on it or it WILL leak. Not a tough job. Just pay attention to details and take your time. Mike
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  #5  
Old 09-07-2012, 01:39 PM
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Steve Christ's book "How to rebuild your big block Ford" is great if you can find a copy. It has much more detailed pictures than the shop manual and tells you everything you need to know about rebuilding FE engines.

John
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Old 09-07-2012, 05:38 PM
davidmij davidmij is offline
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Thanks gents,
I got it apart and it looks to me like it's in OK shape, but then again I have no idea what it should look like, so I'm providing these pix.

According to my shop manual the "timing chain deflection" (the distance of slop that the chain has on the left side while the right side is tight) should be no more than 1/2 inch. Mines right at 3/8. Mine also is made of steel and not nylon. Proof again that this engine has probably been rebuilt before.

Anyway, whether the existing one is OK or not, I'm going to install the new "true roller set" that you were kind enough to point out at Summit Racing for me Dave Dare.

My big question is this. A few days ago I watched the rotor as I turned the crank by hand. It moved a full hour on the clock face. That's 30 degrees. However, this morning when I had the water pump off I wanted to see it again so I cranked the engine by hand and watched again. This time the rotor moved right away and had no slop. What in the world could that be all about? Could it be that my distributor is suspect?

If I wiggle the distributor shaft left and right it has a little slop, and I can hear it move (a clicking sound as it taps each side)

BTW, the video and pictures of Dave's rebuild are awesome, thanks!

I also found this good little video on how to put the Harmonic balancer back on. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ex_yJ_V5UH8

Please let me know what you think of the distributor maybe being my problem.

Thx, Dave J
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Old 09-07-2012, 06:19 PM
davidmij davidmij is offline
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Oh!
One more thing. My new crank gear has the 3 key slots to use for either advancing, retarding, or zeroing the timing. Do I use the one labeled "A" to advance it 4 degrees as you mentioned Dave?

Will this mean that when I am at TDC and the pulley degree marks are at "0" I will really be at 4 degrees advanced?

I find it humorous that I listed as "experienced" yet I am so lost with a lot of this stuff. ;0)

thx, Dave J
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Old 09-07-2012, 06:48 PM
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Default 1967 390 timing chain

Hi Dave, what level of "Experience" you have on this Forum is determined by the number of posts that you make! You are a "Newbie" until you make so many posts. Then you go up a level, to "Apprentice" when you make 30 posts. At 100 posts you are raised to the level of "Experienced" and eventually, you become "Super Experienced" at 500 posts.. This is all determined by the software, even though one might not even know how to change the oil in your Tbird!
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Old 09-07-2012, 07:26 PM
davidmij davidmij is offline
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Yeah, that's what I kind of figured Clark, I was just being funny cuz I'd be lost without you guys, yet I show as "experienced".

So, if there is anyone out there right now who might be able to spare a few minutes of phone time I sure could use some help.

I took off the old chain, cam sprocket and crank sprocket. The cam pin is at 3 o'clockish and my crank sprocket key is at 6 o'clock. When I line up my timing marks on each sprocket, and then slide them on with the crank key as a guide, my cam pin hole is at about 1:30 - it doesn't line up. Is there something I'm missing, or don't get?

thx, Dave J
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Old 09-08-2012, 12:22 AM
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Unbolt and pull your distributor. Look at the gear teeth at the end. Take a pic so we can see the teeth. They should not have 'knife edge' teeth.

You can't go wrong using a roller chain set.

Since you have everything apart, now is a good time to find true TDC. Download a crankshaft timing wheel (they're free), use a bendable pointer (coat hanger) to mount under any bolt head, and get a Summit Pistron Stop (or a 1/2" x 1-1/2" slug mounted to a spark plug). I think Summit sells them as well. I made my own because I also weld.

By finding true TDC, you can tell if your cam is truly in time with the crankshaft. Sometimes when adding all the tolerances of all the keyways, timing is quite a bit off. Advanced cam is much better than retarded cam. In fact, I advance my street cams at least four degrees. That way, if the chain stretches, timing comes closer to zero. In the mean time, my low end torque is boosted. Cam timing is UN-related to spark timing, so that part doesn't change when you tune your engine.

When you install a new timing chain set, it should be VERY tight. Meaning, it is somewhat tricky to get the sprockets mounted because there doesn't seem to be enough chain slack. - Dave
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