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  #11  
Old 09-21-2018, 07:46 PM
Tbird1044 Tbird1044 is offline
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Meanwhile, does anyone know a suitable replacement for these vertical radiator side seals? I've checked the vendors but they don't seem to be being reproduced for 58-60. Thanks![/quote]

Don:
Just looked in the Larry's catalogue and I think the number is B16137A, pg.41 on new cat. You could always call them to verify it is the correct part you need. Also, I'm pretty sure some of the vendors back there should also carry them.
BTW, $4.68/pr.
Don't get rid of the 6 blade fan and shroud. I have a new (3 core) radiator and took off the factory 5 blade fan and installed a 6 blade flex and also installed the shroud. When it's hot outside, I still need to watch the temp as it climbs really fast in stop and go traffic.
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  #12  
Old 09-21-2018, 08:24 PM
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Hi Nyles Yes I'm hanging on to the 6 blade & the shroud...I'm just hoping that I won't need them any more. And yes I saw that item in Larry's but wasn't exactly sure what it was. They list B8348A on that same page as the 64-66 Radiator Side Seals but no other years but maybe that's something else altogether? I'll give them a call. Thanks!
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  #13  
Old 09-21-2018, 11:01 PM
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MACs list these as radiator to hood seals. Not quite correct, but looks like the right seals and has the same number as Larrys.
Nyles
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  #14  
Old 10-03-2018, 06:45 PM
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Default well, I've probably shot myself in the foot here...

Yes Nyles, those are the ones. Thanks!

Things were moving along pretty well with the engine compartment cleanup until today, when one of the bolts for the expansion tank broke when trying to disassemble for clean-up and paint. So, minor panic and then some research and a trip to the local professional tool store for a proper bolt extractor and drill bit. Drilled the hole, no problem. Then, rookie mistake...after getting the extractor started...too much oomph, extractor snaps off. Panic mode is elevated and return to tool store for some professional advice. Long story short, the highest grade bits they sell don't put much of a dent in the extractor remnant which now must be drilled out as well. Last photo shows current state, with everything filed off flush

Have I really messed up here?? I need a beverage.
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File Type: jpg BrokenBolt.JPG (136.8 KB, 92 views)
File Type: jpg AllTheBits.JPG (84.9 KB, 92 views)
File Type: jpg FiledSmooth.JPG (134.3 KB, 90 views)
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  #15  
Old 10-03-2018, 07:41 PM
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Carbide will get through it. The biggest challenge is staying on center. The standard answer would be a machine shop because they can use heavy machines to mill it out but that's not practical in this case.

Personally, now this is me... I would dry, then heat the area and try to soften the easy-out. This will help quite a bit. You already have a hole and heat will help break the threads. Then, I would make a drill guide using the large thermostat hole and the other bolt hole, to make a drill guide. I would also start small and work my way up using a good carbide bit. Not the kind for masonry but the kind machinists use. They look like a regular drill bit but the entire tip is carbide.

There is another method. It requires a dry environment and plenty of heat. Those bolts come out much easier when heat is applied. I've had plenty of practice with oil gallery plugs that rarely come out without stripping the head. I drill a hole in the middle (as you have) and apply heat until it's red hot. A drilled hole first, gives expanded metal somewhere to go. Then, pull the bolt out using either a nut and my welder or by using an easy-out (heat will destroy the easy out if left in too long) or simply grind a drill bit so that it is square. The common denominator here is heat. Sometimes I use a left-hand drill bit.

In any case, don't freak out, Don. This can be done. The hole goes all the way through, which is good. You may feel part of the bolt on the inside as well. The absolute worst case is when a bolt is bottomed and the head shears off.

Use harder replacement bolts with pipe sealant on the threads. - Dave
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Old 10-04-2018, 07:28 PM
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Thanks for the pep talk Dave! Lots of info there to digest, and I'm still gonna be stressing until I get that sucker out. I have a propane torch that works OK for soldering but I think I need a different tip to concentrate the flame to get that stub red hot. I have no idea how I would rig up a drill guide the way you describe...sounds like a good idea though. Would that use some sort of off-the-shelf contraption with some "customization"? Do you have any pictures?

The larger drill bit I have says BRUTE 5/32 HS USA which seems pretty garden-variety, assuming HS and HSS are equivalent? I did some research and need to do more, but is this what I need?
https://www.grainger.com/product/MIC...ill-Bit-16T546
On a positive note the radiator is back from the shop and looking like new, and here's what a newly re-chromed bumper looks like after the bumper guard divots are filled in.
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File Type: jpg DrillBits.JPG (80.6 KB, 70 views)
File Type: jpg NewBumper.JPG (129.0 KB, 70 views)
File Type: jpg torch.JPG (123.3 KB, 72 views)
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  #17  
Old 10-05-2018, 12:48 AM
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HS = High Speed
HSS = High Speed Steel

You're going to need carbide steel to get through carbon steel. It helps to anneal carbon steel first, if you can.

I would not worry about using a smaller tip but I would use MAP gas instead of propane. MAP is much hotter. Dry the area and make the broken bolt site cherry red hot. This will relieve the stress exerted by the bolt and the easy-out. I'm hoping you can feel the broken easy-out by reaching inside the thermostat hole. Do this after it cools. If this is true, you may luck out and knock out the broken piece from the back.

DRILL GUIDE: Let's say I have a piece of 1/4" steel that is round and it fits inside the thermostat hole. Let's say I have a second piece of steel that covers the t-stat hole AND the bolt holes. Fasten both pieces together by welding or bolting, so they can't move.

Using the expansion tank as a pattern, drill two clearance holes through this steel where the expansion tank would normally go but make the 'broken bolt hole' smaller (like 3/16"). Instead of mounting the expansion tank, I'm using this fabricated flat piece of steel with mounting holes and a protrusion to keep it 'fixed' in the hole (so it cannot slide around).

With this piece bolted on one side, use the smaller hole to drill out the easy-out. This smaller hole will act as a drill guide for your carbide bit so it needs to be exactly where you want to drill. I hope I described this so you understand.

A machine shop would clamp your block and use a mill to drill through the easy-out. The mill is fixed, solid. This fabricated piece of steel would do the same but for hand-drilling. In other words, it's a drill bushing. - Dave
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  #18  
Old 10-05-2018, 09:33 AM
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When this happened when I was working, we always tried a drop of silver solder on the end of a rod, and then silver soldered it to the broken end of the E Z Out. Often between the heat and now having something to grab onto, the E Z Out can be carefully wiggled free. If that didn't work it was off to the mill or EDM depending on the part.
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Old 10-05-2018, 05:21 PM
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Joe - I don't think I'm equipped and I'm positive I'm not experienced enough to consider the silver soldering but thanks! Wish I was.
Dave - your explanation about the drill guide was great. Upon thinking it through like you explained, I get stuck at the point where I'm trying to line up to drill the guide holes on the flat piece covering the thermostat hole and both bolt holes. I probably am just not visualizing it yet. Even if the circular piece in the thermostat hole is like bone tight in the hole and attached to the flat piece, how can I be sure I'm lined up when I start drilling into the flat piece? I can use the exp tank mount as a guide but where is the reference to the actual holes?
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  #20  
Old 10-06-2018, 03:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by del View Post
... how can I be sure I'm lined up when I start drilling into the flat piece? I can use the exp tank mount as a guide but where is the reference to the actual holes?
That's the easy part, Don. After you make the plate with the 'centering puck', stick a piece of clay or better yet, American cheese over the hole on the block. Squeeze your new plate in position, and the hole will show up on the reverse side. Be careful not to rotate it. Shove it straight in and straight out. The cheese will naturally go into the threaded block hole but leave a nice outline on your new piece.

The other hole can be located by the expansion tank flange or another piece of cheese over the broken bolt.

Before doing anything else I would heat the broken easy-out cherry red hot to relieve any stress, draw out hardness and to loosen, then let it slowly cool. The easy-out and possibly the broken bolt may come out easier than you think. - Dave
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