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  #61  
Old 11-11-2017, 04:28 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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They got it finally! It seems Firestone was expanding the tire's width at the bead and placing it under heaters. When they thought they waited enough, they let the tire revert to original shape and mounted it on the wheel.

They did try the strap around the tire to no avail. They theorized the tire was stored in such a fashion as to compress it's width.

I know this place mounts thousands of tires, and they must know a thing or two with 8 bays hopping. Although I've never heard of a mounting issue with a high profile tire, I suppose they encountered a problem rarely faced.

It looks great after hammering the very, very, tight Sun Ray wheel cover that likes to become a UFO under any old driving situation.

Dean
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  #62  
Old 11-11-2017, 04:39 PM
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jopizz jopizz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanj View Post
They got it finally! It seems Firestone was expanding the tire's width at the bead and placing it under heaters. When they thought they waited enough, they let the tire revert to original shape and mounted it on the wheel.

They did try the strap around the tire to no avail. They theorized the tire was stored in such a fashion as to compress it's width.

I know this place mounts thousands of tires, and they must know a thing or two with 8 bays hopping. Although I've never heard of a mounting issue with a high profile tire, I suppose they encountered a problem rarely faced.
Dean
Glad to see that you finally had some success. I've never heard that storing a tire incorrectly can affect mounting it but who knows.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanj View Post
It looks great after hammering the very, very, tight Sun Ray wheel cover that likes to become a UFO under any old driving situation.
In the past I used to have two sets of hubcaps. One beat up set to drive on and one pristine set that I put on at shows.

John
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  #63  
Old 11-12-2017, 12:32 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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Originally posted by jopizz:

"In the past I used to have two sets of hubcaps. One beat up set to drive on and one pristine set that I put on at shows."

John

In the first year of operating a Squarebird, I bought 3 Sun Ray wheel covers. One to replace a badly damaged original, and 2 for spares.

I've used up the 2 spares. The missing 2 came off the front. Both were tightened and re-hammered weekly. Many more came off the front and were retrieved.

Now I bought 4 more. My plan is tighten the snot out of the rear clips. Additionally, I just tried foil duct tape on the clips to make these thicker and tighter. I saw this method used with regular tape on plastic wheel covers. I noticed Ford beefed up these clips on later year wheel covers. We'll see.

Dean
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  #64  
Old 11-13-2017, 12:18 PM
pbf777 pbf777 is offline
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They did try the strap around the tire to no avail. They theorized the tire was stored in such a fashion as to compress it's width. Dean[/quote]


Yes, if the tires have been stored stacked, the units to the bottom will, given time, become compressed/squeezed and prove more troublesome to inflate.

As far as attempting to compress the tire's tread face to force the sidewalls outward to the rim, this absolutely will work, but one must apply adequate force about the circumference. On tires of this size, generally a 3" ratcheting tie-down strap proves sufficient; but for the larger truck tires, I have found that a chain and multiple chain/load binders are more capable.

But, I'll bet, the Firestone Tire store rules of engagement don't list this "atmosphere expansion via heat process" as an option; but it would have saved a lot of time and frustration if properly executed. Now children, I not advising you try this at home, but on my bigger tires (16.00 x 20's, 14.00 x 24's & 445 X 65 X 19.5's, etc.) I often utilize the not so O.S.H.A approved method of applying a deemed reasonable sum (established with experience) of "starting fluid" (ether) within the inner volume of the tire as mounted, and ignite! Works every time!

Scott.
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  #65  
Old 11-13-2017, 01:51 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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I often utilize the not so O.S.H.A approved method of applying a deemed reasonable sum (established with experience) of "starting fluid" (ether) within the inner volume of the tire as mounted, and ignite! Works every time!

Scott.[/quote]

I've heard and have seen on you tube the starter fluid method. Anything with fire short of trying to loosen a bolt is out of my league. All I know is Firestone spread the bead width and used a heater to improve its pliable characteristics.

I just can't believe what a pain in the can this tire has been. The last time I had a car close to this kind was a 1966 Chevelle, and that was in 1971! It's problems included the tranny shifter engaging 1st and 4th gears, eating voltage regulators, busted clutch cross-shaft stud, exhaust system, and rust. Never did I lose a wheel cover or have a problem with $25 bias-ply Firestones. That was back in the day of 16,000 mile tires.

Dean
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  #66  
Old 11-13-2017, 03:36 PM
OX1 OX1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
Huh??? Ford mounts five tires in less than one minute to match line speed.

Dave
Sounds like a really neat setup, would love to see
that in action if you have any links to videos.

But I'm not sure how much it relates to the woes of
seasoned home hobbiest (with their own machines)
or even a full blown professional tire shop.

You have convinced me though, that I'm too old to keep
having to kill myself with these low profile tires.
Looking into this add on, which does not fit my
tire machine specifically, but much cheaper than
a new machine, and looks easy enough to fit with
a bit of fabbing.

https://www.derekweaver.com/rodders-...tire-changers/


Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Johnston View Post
Cant believe they don't have a band that goes around the tread and draws up tight to expand the tire to the wheel with air pressure. We changed them by hand on the farm and used a rope around the tire and drew it up tight by twisting a big screw driver. No problem. Squeezed the sides out quickly.

Everyone today has gotten into the habit of mounting tires with the "pretty side" of the wheel up so not to scratch anything. Beyond that, they don't think and some places are clueless. I stopped at an old tire shop and asked about mounting my wire wheels and tubes then balancing them "stud centric" . The guy at the desk said they never heard of that and all wheels are tubeless, but an old timer said "Hell YES"! Would be fun since he hadn't changed a tube for years!!!

Just have to find the right place to get work done.
I've had tires of all sizes that for whatever reason, the
beads are practically touching before attempting
to mount. Mounting on even a std width rim can
sometimes be a challenge if a tire starts out like this.
Even with straps sometimes........

I recently had a set of 235/65R15 tires mounting on
7" wide rims that were not easy at all to bead up due
to the this bead "closeness". I think it happens if
tires were sitting for long periods unmounted, at the
bottom of the pile.
at the bottom of a stack.
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